ARC 2-Day Clinical Training November 18th and 19th

Brief Description

The Attachment, Regulation, and Competency (ARC) framework is a core-components treatment model, developed to provide a guiding framework for thoughtful clinical intervention with children and youth who have experienced complex trauma and their caregiving systems.  Drawing from the fields of trauma, attachment, and child development, the framework recognizes the importance of working with the child-in-context, of acknowledging the role of historical experiences and adaptive responses in current presentation, and of intervening with the surrounding environment – whether primary caregivers or treatment system – to support and facilitate the child’s healthy growth and development.  Rather than identify step-by-step intervention strategies, the framework identifies 8 core targets of intervention which rest on 3 foundational strategies, key skills/goals within each domain, developmental and cultural considerations, and potential applications across settings.

Expanded Description

As many as one in four youth will experience a potentially traumatic exposure, and many of these will be multiple or prolonged. The impact of these stressors is far-reaching, and often repeats across generations as yesterday’s impacted children become tomorrow’s parents and caregivers. Establishing effective practice for this population is a priority, but is challenging, given their diverse histories, their varied presentations, the multifaceted contextual, cultural, and developmental influences which shape them, and the wide range of systems within which they seek care.

The Attachment, Regulation, and Competency (ARC) (Kinnibrugh & Blaustein, 2005; Blaustein & Kinniburgh, 2010, 2018) framework is a core-components treatment model, developed to provide a guiding framework for thoughtful clinical intervention with complexly traumatized youth and their caregiving systems. Drawing from the fields of trauma, attachment, and child development, the framework recognizes the importance of working with the child-in-context, of acknowledging the role of historical experiences and adaptive responses in current presentation, and of intervening with the surrounding environment – whether primary caregivers or treatment system – to support and facilitate the child’s healthy growth and development. Rather than identify step-by-step intervention strategies, the framework identifies 8 core targets of intervention which rest on 3 foundational strategies, key skills/goals within each domain, developmental and cultural considerations, and potential applications across settings.

In this workshop, we will examine the theoretical foundations underpinning this framework; build skills and knowledge in each identified treatment domain; and discuss case applications and considerations across contexts.

Typical ARC Clinical Training Content Outline:

  1. Introduction to the construct: Understanding Complex / Developmental Trauma, and overview of the ARC framework

  2. Foundational concepts

    1. Engagement

    2. Routines and rhythms

    3. Education

  • Attachment

    1. Caregiver affect management: Building caregiver capacity to manage and tolerate affect

    2. Caregiver-child attunement: Supporting caregivers in understanding and interpreting child behavior, and responding in a supportive manner

    3. Increasing effective caregiver response: Increasing caregiver ability to effectively respond to child behaviors in a trauma-sensitive manner

  1. Regulation

    1. Identification: Ability to identify and label internal experience, and to connect emotion to thoughts, behaviors, physiological sensations, and experiences

    2. Modulation: Ability to regulate internal arousal and external manifestations

  2. Competency

    1. Relational Connection: Ability to communicate and share internal experience and engage in relationship

    2. Executive functions: Ability to plan, anticipate, problem-solve, and delay response

    3. Self-Development and Identity: Building positive and coherent sense of self and future orientation

  3. Trauma Experience Integration

    1. Trauma Experience Integration: Building reflective process around historical life experiences, in order to support engagement in present life

Training facilitated by Joseph Spinazzola from the Trauma Training Centre

Brief Academic Bio of Joseph Spinazzola Ph.D., LLC

Formal Education:

1999 Doctor of Philosophy in Psychology, Duke University, Durham, NC

1996 Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies, Duke University, Durham, NC

1992 Bachelor of Arts in Psychology (With Distinction), Yale University, New Haven, CT

Various related trainings including but not limited to:

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy

Community-base Intervention

Advanced Critical incident Stress Management

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Level 2

Dialectic Behavior Therapy

Teaching engagements include but are not limited to:

Instructor – LeTourneau University

Adjunct Professor – Richmont Graduate University

Research Professor of Clinical Practice – Suffolk University

Instructor – The Trauma Center at JRI

Instructor – Boston University School of Medicine

Co-Instructor and Instructor – Duke University

Publications:

Joseph has been cited in 52 peer reviewed journals and participated in the authorship of 17 books/manuals

Cost: $400

Location:

Thornhill Community Centre

3091 Century St, Thornhill, BC

Time: 8:30 am to 4:00pm November 18th and 19th

Contact: events@tdcss.ca

What you get:

Two days clinical training in the ARC framework

A copy of the primary ARC manual: Treating Traumatic Stress in Children and Adolescents

Certificate of Completion

Coffee, tea, and light snacks

Light lunch

ARC Training Payment Gateway

$ 400
Select Payment Method
Personal Info

Billing Details

Terms

Donation Total: $400